New website discount! If you apply before 16th December you'll save £250 per program!
Save £250 per program! Apply before 16th December!
Save £250 per program!
Apply before 16th December!

Cambridge Summer School: places in Cambridge where history was changed forever

Cambridge has been a key site for many people and events that shaped history. Our last blog talked about some of the extra-curricular advantages of studying abroad; this blog is about some specific sites that make Cambridge such a special place to be. Important scientific discoveries and influential academic research, as well as significant writers and much-loved actors, comedians and directors, all have their roots in Cambridge. The city centre alone is full of landmarks where these discoveries were made, or those people lived and worked. Reach Cambridge is a unique international summer program as these historical places are on the students’ doorstep. The Eagle The Eagle pub, right in the centre of Cambridge, is 450 years old. It has therefore hosted Cambridge University staff and students since the 16th Century – renowned poet Sylvia Plath writes about going there in her diaries.  The Eagle is most famous for the events of 28th February 1953. It was there that two Cambridge scientists, James Watson and Francis Crick, declared they had ‘discovered the secret of life’ – DNA. The ADC Theatre The ADC Theatre is the oldest University playhouse in the country. Its comedy group, the Footlights, has spawned some of the most influential comedians.  ‘Monty Python’s’ John Cleese and Eric Idle, as well as Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, and more recently Simon Bird and Joe Thomas from ‘The Inbetweeners’, and Richard Ayaode from ‘The I.T. Crowd’, are amongst many successful alumni. Gandalf (otherwise known as Sir Ian McKellan) also graced the ADC stage, along with Emma Thompson, Rachel Weisz, Tilda Swinton – the list is endless. Isaac Newton’s Apple Tree The most famous apple tree in the world, which inspired Newton’s discovery of gravity, unfortunately died around 1815. However, Cambridge University’s Botanic Garden is home to a descendent of the tree, created through seeds or cuttings from the original. These are just three examples of historical landmarks that make Cambridge such an enriching area for an international study program. Students of the Reach Cambridge residential summer school walk past these sites in the beautiful, condensed city centre every day. If that sounds like your cup of tea, apply now for the greatest summer ever!